Case studies
Nitzan ShorerUI Designer

The evolution of an icon: the Verigreen logo – from basic shape to elegant symbol

Verigreen is an open-source gated check-in solution that saves developers’ time by running real-time verification on commits. This handy tool was developed by Hewlett Packard Enterprises’ developers with the goal of leveraging the power of the community to create the best in-class gated check-in technology.

Having working on this product prior to having a UI/UX assistance on board, the Verigreen team has come up with a basic logo, where the first letter (“v”) is actually a check mark, to insinuate the product’s checking capabilities.

The original Verigreen logo
The original Verigreen logo

Joining the team later on, we all agreed this logo needed to change for two main reasons: one, the look and feel of it seem too basic and did not align to the sophisticated capabilities of the product. Second, the usage of the check mark was a bit cliché, and needed a serious upgrading.

Moreover, the new logo had to convey certain values. The main ones being “reliable” and “solid”, whilst in terms of aesthetics, the goal was to create a symbol that will have a slick and modern feel to it. The first modification was to separate between the symbol and the name of the product, so that it will be viable even without the “verigreen” name. A solid symbol will be able to standalone and help the logo (and later on, the product) become more memorable and approachable. Using the “v” of “verigreen” as an anchor seem as a good starting point.

Various Verigreen logo test
Various Verigreen logo test

Having the “checking” capabilities in mind, I also wanted to add more “conceptual layers” to the logo, so that besides the obvious “checking” attribute, people will also get the sense of “growing” (i.e., “verigreen” is a tool to promote growth within one’s organization / company). With this thought in mind, I kept sketching until I felt I had reached what I’ve hoped for.

Verigreen final logo
Verigreen final logo

When presented to the team, this version received the most positive feedback compared to the other versions. Its relative abstract shape caused people to perceive different interpretations of the logo; other than “growth”, people saw visual “hints” that made them think of flying birds, tress, a maze and last but not least, a check mark…

To conclude, a good logo should not rely on ascetics alone. Beautiful shapes exist by the bundle, but what makes a symbol to standout and be both memorable and accessible is the meaning behind it. Logos should strive to portray the product’s attributes so that it will not only be beautiful, but also smart.